14 comments on “How Much Weight to Lift to Build Muscle – You May Be Shocked

  1. Hey man good article.
    But what about static contraction for building muscle? when you hold up your max possible weight in your strongest possible for 5 sec’s and your workout’s over. Many people have added 10 pounds of muscle in 10 weeks by static contraction.

    • Ronald he includes static contraction into AthleanX part 2 but it’s just a training phase like everything else.

  2. Cameron Thornton on Aug 9, 2012 12:04 am | Reply

    Jeff, You hit the nail on the head with this article! Clearly, anyone who even try’s ANY of your so very much appreciated youtube videos or actually follow the AX-1/2 program, understand this concept quickly. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve gone into the gym and get the comment “you need to bump the weight to get bigger”. Control the weight, don’t let it control you.

  3. Martin b on Aug 31, 2012 4:11 am | Reply

    I always trained this way in the younger years of my life and yes it was all about the macho image in the gym who could grunt the loadest haha. 30yrs on and it’s only now we are getting the concept of how things are done properly to gain clean muscle and strength in a short time with a good eating plan which is the key to all training.

  4. Was doing traditional bodybuilding workouts. got muscle, but go no core stability, etc. Since doing athleanx, I am not like the traditional bodybuilders, just mass. I have mass and speed. love the conditioning workouts!!!

  5. Great article… I’m in my 40’s and have been doing Athlean-X for almost 7 months and have learned so much about physical conditioning. I know of a guy who benches like the picture above. I told him once your going to hurt your back benching that way. His comment to me… but I’m benching more than you…? With your program it’s made me realize i can work harder for a shorter period of time and get better results… Great program please keep up the great tips.

  6. Eric Nerison on Dec 16, 2012 5:58 pm | Reply

    Hi, nice article. Im 15 years old I weigh 160 im a freshman football player and i want to weigh 220 pounds, how can i do that and how fast do you believe i can do that?! Thank you for reading.

    • Brian on Feb 1, 2013 2:46 pm |

      I know you were probably expecting someone else to comment on this but ill give you advice that i wish i would have followed more. Before you get into the heavy lifting, get better at the technique associated with each lift or drill, these will prevent injury and keep you on the field more. And second, don’t think that you need to weigh 220 pounds to be a good player. I only weighed 190 and played middle backer in high school, but i threw my body around as if i weighed 225, and i got recognized for it. Pay attention to detail. Good Luck and keep your head up!

    • DAVE HAG on Feb 28, 2013 12:46 am |

      ERIC at your age i would eat everything you can just stay away from sugar,i would also do big body part lifting,bench dead lift squat with heavy weight low reps for 10 weaks then take two weeks of light lifting then go back to the 10 week program again.this should help you gain size and weight and hang in there you are still young and your just starting to get a good bit of your own testosterone and even more in the coming years.stay away from the roids they could stop your bodies natural growth at your age(bones)stunt your size

  7. I must say I’m reading every word on this website, not finished yet though. I can say objectively because I am not a customer (although seriously considering), and from my many years of formal education and training in physiology, kinesiology, sports medicine/athletic training, and three clinical cardiology credentials, that the materials written here are the most closely aligned to the science of resistance training than anything I’ve read in 30 years (yes, Im that old).
    I apologize in advance for my questions. They are aimed to clarify your articles/videos as well as testing your science. I’ve just realized that not all your information is on this site (i.e. static contraction), which I can understand why, now.
    I admittedly remain skeptical, mainly because I know the science and have seen so much bull over the years even today. No offense is intended.
    Thank you.

  8. A correction, the swinging pull-up is not a Crossfit pull-up. It is a transition style pull-up that is recommended for those that can’t do full body-weight pull-ups. This is called kipping. I leave it to experts as to whether this transition method is beneficial or not :-) They also recommend using powerband or chair assist in their posts.

    The problem with Crossfit is that the WOD’s (work out of the day) are difficult if not impossible for beginners and even intermediate trainees. The warm-ups themselves involve full body-weight pull-ups and dips. You have to be in good shape just to even complete the warm-ups! Crossfit works if you are already in great shape. I doubt you can get in this shape without drastically modifying the program as a beginner or intermediate trainee.

  9. Pingback: How to Build a Great Body at Your Very Own Home Gym? « Health and Beauty Quest Health and Beauty Quest

    • Sean Thumper on Oct 6, 2014 4:20 am |

      So say I’m doing squats, benchpress, and deadlifts for size. If I follow this, “EVERY REP of EVERY EXERCISE by C-O-N-T-R-A-C-T-I-N-G,” when is a good stopping point for me? Until I reach the last rep to the point of failure? And as for sets, do I go from there depending on how I feel?

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